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{\rtf1\ansi {\colortbl;\red0\green0\blue0;\red0\green0\blue255;\red0\green255\blue255;\red0\green255\blue0;\red255\green0\blue255;\red255\green0\blue0;\red255\green255\blue0;\red255\green255\blue255;}{\fonttbl{\f0\froman\cpg0\fcharset0 Times New Roman;}{\f1\fswiss\cpg0\fcharset0 Arial;}{\f2\froman\cpg1252\fcharset0 Times New Roman;}{\f3\fswiss\cpg1252\fcharset0 Arial;}{\f4\froman\cpg1251\fcharset204 Times New Roman;}{\f5\fswiss\cpg1251\fcharset204 Arial;}{\f6\froman\cpg1250\fcharset238 Times New Roman;}{\f7\fswiss\cpg1250\fcharset238 Arial;}{\f8\froman\cpg1257\fcharset186 Times New Roman;}{\f9\fswiss\cpg1257\fcharset186 Arial;}{\f10\froman\cpg1254\fcharset162 Times New Roman;}{\f11\fswiss\cpg1254\fcharset162 Arial;}{\f12\froman\cpg1253\fcharset161 Times New Roman;}{\f13\fswiss\cpg1253\fcharset161 Arial;}{\f14\froman\cpg1255\fcharset177 Times New Roman;}{\f15\fswiss\cpg1255\fcharset177 Arial;}}{\stylesheet {\sbasedon222\f2\fs20 Normal;}}\paperw12240\paperh15840\margl1753\margr4881\margt1440\margb720 \sectd \sbknone\pgwsxn12240\pghsxn15840\marglsxn1753\margrsxn4881\margtsxn1440\margbsxn720\cols1\colsx60 \pard \plain \cbpat8\ql\li1195\fi0\ri0\sb0\sa0\tx5342 \f2\fs20{\b0\i0\cf1\charscalex100\expndtw4\f2\cchs0\lang1033\fs20 YIJAYACANDRA : JAYACANDRA{\charscalex100\expndtw0\tab }\expndtw-13 329}\par \pard \plain \cbpat8\qj\li58\fi0\ri7\sb234\sa0\sl-241\slmult0 \f2\fs20{\b0\i0\cf1\charscalex100\expndtw0\f2\cchs0\lang1033\fs24 candra's reign was marked by the literary efforts of his \expndtw-1 minister for peace and war, Laksmklhara, who produced \expndtw3 the \i Kritya-Kalpatam (Kalpadmma\\ \i0 one of the most important works on law, procedure, and other interest\-\expndtw0 ing topics.}\par \pard \plain \cbpat8\ql\li90\fi0\ri0\sb144\sa0 \f2\fs20{\b0\i\cf1\charscalex100\expndtw-7\f2\cchs0\lang1033\fs23 Vijayacandra}\par \pard \plain \cbpat8\qj\li43\fi479\ri4\sb112\sa0\sl-241\slmult0 \f2\fs20{\b0\i0\cf1\charscalex100\expndtw-1\f2\cchs0\lang1033\fs24 Govindacandra was succeeded by his son, Vijaya\-\expndtw2 candra, shortly after 1154 A.D. The \i Prithvtraja-Raso \i0\expndtw7 credits him with extensive victories, but not much \expndtw3 reliance can be placed on these bardic tales. Like his \expndtw1 father, Vijayacandra also stood as a bulwark against the \expndtw13 aggressions of the Moslems.\super 1\nosupersub  He drove back the \expndtw10 forces of Amir Khusrau or his son Khusrau Malik, \expndtw4 who had occupied Lahore after their expulsion from \expndtw1 Ghazni by Alauddin Ghoii. In the cast Vijayacandra maintained the Gahadavala authority intact over Sotith \expndtw8 Bihar, but it appears from an inscription that in the \expndtw1 west he must have come into conflict with Vigraharaja \expndtw7 Visaladeva, who wrested Delhi from his hands.\super 2}\par \pard \plain \cbpat8\ql\li25\fi0\ri0\sb126\sa0 \f2\fs20{\b0\i\cf1\charscalex82\expndtw1\f2\cchs0\lang1033\fs25 Jqyacandra}\par \pard \plain \cbpat8\qj\li29\fi468\ri0\sb104\sa0\sl-241\slmult0 \f2\fs20{\b0\i0\cf1\charscalex100\expndtw-1\f2\cchs0\lang1033\fs24 Vijayacandra's successor was his son, Jayacandra, \expndtw10 whose accession took place on Sunday, the zist of \expndtw3 June, 1170 A.D. He is said to have attacked Yaclavara-\expndtw-1 ja of Devagiri, twice defeated Siddharaja of Anhilwada, \expndtw6 made eight tributary kings prisoners, and vanquished \expndtw5 the Yavana (Moslem) ruler Sihabuddin several times. \expndtw7 All these bardic traditions lack corroboration, literary}\par \pard \plain \cbpat8\ql\li403\fi0\ri0\sb198\sa0 \f2\fs20{\b0\i0\super\cf1\charscalex100\expndtw4\f2\cchs0\lang1033\fs20 1\nosupersub  \i Ind. Ant., \i0 XV, pp. 7, 9, verse 9.}\par \pard \plain \cbpat8\ql\li400\fi0\ri0\sb0\sa0\tx5004 \f2\fs20{\b0\i0\cf1\charscalex72\expndtw12\f2\cchs0\lang1033\fs27 cf. ?TSR55nTt*nfRfi^{\charscalex100\expndtw0\tab }\expndtw0 !}\par \pard \plain \cbpat8\qj\li0\fi392\ri4\sb0\sa0\sl-198\slmult0 \f2\fs20{\b0\i0\super\cf1\charscalex100\expndtw6\f2\cchs0\lang1033\fs20 2\nosupersub /. \i A. S. B., \i0 1886 (Vol. LV, pt. I), p. 42, v) 22. Thus the \expndtw4 traditional belief that Delhi came in the possession of the Caha-\expndtw9 rnanas in the time of Prithviraja III is baseless. Anangapala \expndtw3 Tomara is represented in popular stories as the founder of Dhillika \expndtw6 or Delhi. These Tomaras were probably feudatories of the kings \expndtw5 of Kanauj.}\par }